Stop Humiliating Teachers

Stop Humiliating Teachers

Stop Humiliating Teachers

 

A Habitual Place Necessary: Almost everyone we know has been transformed, or shaken at least seriously by a college professor, perhaps, but often in high school, often by a man or woman who led to the Home of one or two points in physics, literature and ethics, and looked at us severely and said that, in fact, may be more than you are. In the best of the masters are gods every day, standing in the world of entry. If they are correct and good, it is perhaps the morally more impressive adults who know their students. For a time, they are the law, which is knowledge, which is the law.
Everyone celebrates their personal memory of individual teachers, however, as a culture, we are tackling the heels profession. Journalist education, Dana Goldstein, in her book “The War of the Masters,” published in 2014, examines the history of America and describes a recurrent situation of what she calls “moral panic” – the trend, when they are economic or social crisis , To blame the teachers of public schools. They had to create crisis, logic, by not educating the young.
We were in panic for more than a decade, during which attacks on public school teachers were especially virulent. They are lazy mismanaged, and tenacious to receive their lavish salary of thirty-six thousand dollars a year (the national average salary, according to the National Education Association). As Goldstein said, “Today the inefficient master holder has emerged as a feared character, a vampire boy sucks taxes on his inflated pension plans and health care, regardless of the children under his care.” This person, we are not able to produce an efficient work force; Just look at how late we are compared to other international standardized testing countries. Our teachers are poor in mass; You have to make a serious effort to put the evil before they cause more harm. EtcĂ©tera It is not only the Republicans who speak this way. Democrats, too, are obsessed with ridding the system of bad teachers. The president down, the leaders demanded “responsibility.”
There is one element of this bad teachers rage is difficult to talk about, and this is often avoided: fear really that we do not know how to educate the poor in urban and rural areas in this country. In particular, we do not know how to educate African-American children, who, according to the Schott Foundation for Public Education, have completed high school at rates over fifty-nine percent. However, if students from poor families continue to be unable to walk, if they do not pass the bachelors in sufficient numbers, and if graduates can not, in many cases, complete their university professors can hardly be guilty. Neither schools nor teachers have created children or the society around them: schools and teachers should do everything possible with the children they receive.
At a time when children from poor families of all races enter the garden, they often lag far behind children who are rich in vocabulary, knowledge, and cognitive skills. Of course, good teachers can help, especially this teacher who takes a child by the hand and turns around. But in recent years, teachers have been held accountable for things that can often exceed their change of powers. They were attacked because they can be attacked. The real problem is persistent poverty.

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