High Jump Technique and Training

High Jump Technique and Training

High Jump Technique and Training

 

At the 1968 Mexico Olympics, sprints and jumps were on stage. The predominance of the United States sprint was demonstrated by world records and medals. Bob Beamon (United States) has jumped much more than the 28 and 29 feet. Dick Fosbury (USA) has also drawn attention to the performance of his medal. He took off in high jump, with his back to the bar and landed on his back. While others claim to have used this style in the early 1960’s, their name is permanently tied to the Fosbury Flop. Next, we will distribute the key elements of the jump and put into practice training plans for several different weeks.
The jump includes an approach that contains a linear transition to a curve. It has a similar takeoff in the long jump, using a penultimate stage and a takeoff. Finally, it has distances between bars and landing in the mouth. Let’s start with a closer look at the approach.
focus

To keep the focus simple let’s discuss this with 5 steps to the right and 5 steps on the curve, including the penultimate and outside steps. Most athletes will take their first step with the same leg they are removed. The training phase will be two stages. Athletes should move to a vertical shift position for the third step. The athlete will continue to accelerate in a straight line until he reaches the fifth step. Be aware of deviations from the outside, the decrease of the athlete. Athletes will also tend to decrease as the transition to the tower approaches. The athlete must have two measures for his approach, parallel to the pit (between 8′-14 ‘depending on the speed) of the internal standard and the other directly on the platform from that point.
The transition to the curve should be a mixture of running in a straight line to an athletic track while still accelerating. To run on a curve, each successive step must be in front of the previous one. Also, the takeoff and the final steps should also be in the change. The start of the lap in the fifth stage takes place in the back. Instead of continuing to push directly behind the athlete is going to push out. This action will begin to rotate the body to the standard distance. The next step will be the ground in the corner opposite the previous step. The poor results of the contact with the ground and the continuous acceleration. It will be a whole body supported ankle. The inner shoulder is lower than the outer shoulders will line up at the hips. The typical mistakes in this part of the approach is the “soccer” model where the athlete plants the foot off and directly cut double track way to the bar. Athletes also tend to lean toward the bar in the penultimate and out of the way. Here are some exercises to help both sides of the approach.
Approach drills

All acceleration work described in the length jump should be made for height jumpers. After athletes grasp the idea of pushing, they have to learn to get up earlier in the beginning. This is similar to the difference at the beginning of 100 m, and the start of the obstacle 110 or 100; There is less time to grow.
good start
Run only the first five steps with and without the transition
Race 3 point
If you have access to a basketball court, run the three-point line. The focus is on the outward push and the single foot contact. The options are to run the whole line or outside (pop-up) at the top (where the shots are taken).
Circle Run Gold Leaps
These can be done anywhere and any diameter of the circle. Try to increase the speed in the approach. Focus on the push out and the performance of a single track. Run and jump circle 2-3 times. We can do them with take-offs (pop-ups) like
Lines with Circles
Have the athlete run in a straight line (like the linear part of the approach), and run 2-3 circles. This is a good exercise to connect the two parts and can be removed from the pit

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